Summer Doldrums

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After an exciting weekend, I woke up with the Summer Doldrums. I have been busy making stitch meditations, zippered pouches, learning new techniques, and other minor crafts…but I have not started on a quilt.
I know I want to make one, but I just do not know what kind I want to make. So, I pulled out my hexagons that I am making for my quilt fabric journal for the year 2018. I decided to stitch them together to see how it looks. I have completed 24 blocks so far.

I think I need to go to a quilt fabric store and get inspired.

Block #24~June 15 Childhood Memories

This week’s block has brought back many childhood memories. My childhood home was in a neighborhood a bit south of downtown San Antonio. I was a Downtown girl. Today, the neighborhood is called Southtown.
My elementary school, St. Mary’s, was a four story building. We had recess on the rooftop. Each morning, we would go through the tunnel under St. Mary’s street that led to St. Mary’s Church. The school library faced the San Antonio Riverwalk. I used to love to sit there and read.
My mom worked at the Tower Life Building, further down by the Riverwalk. When I was in second grade, I convinced my mother to let me stay downtown after school with my friend, Jodell. I promised her that we would stay at the San Antonio Library, which was near her building, on the Riverwalk. Things were a bit different back then, and my mother allowed my friend and I to stay downtown from 3:00 to 5:00. We would walk to her building where my dad would pick all of us up.
The San Antonio Library was located on Market Street, right along the Riverwalk, from 1930-1968. The Riverwalk was not yet developed as it is today. It was still a beautiful place to spend the afternoon. Jodell and I spent most of the time in the library. I remember the excitement we felt when we moved from the downstairs children section, to the upstairs level, where we checked out Jane Eyre! We sat by the river reading this classic. The library also had the Hertzberg Circus Collection. There were some pretty odd and awesome things in this collection that kept us pretty enthralled. We used to climb up on the elephant that sat in front of the library. At this time, the elephant was grey.
Luckily, San Antonio preserved the elephant. It is now located in front of the Witte Museum. It is called Cinnamon Kandy, and it is now painted like a circus elephant.
My granddaughter, daughter-in-law, and I went to the museum last week. When I saw the elephant, it surely brought back so many memories.

Cinnamon Kandy

I just had to capture this memory for my fabric quilt journey. I decided to make the elephant without the circus painting, since that is how it was when I was a child.

Block #22~June 1 Las Tres Hermanas

Three of my favorite people are my siblings. We like to get together as much as possible.
My older sister, Adri, lives in San Antonio,near me. My younger sister, Emma, lives in Austin. My brother, Joseph, lives in Seattle. He comes in for whirlwind visits filled with non-stop action.
This week, I met my two sisters for lunch. Our brother was not with us, so we made sure to talk about him! It is a great feeling to know that I have my siblings as a built-in support system. My quilt journal block for this week captures the good time I had with my sisters this week. I attempted to thread sketch the three of us.
The faces are definitely not a true likeness of ourselves, but the curly and wavy hair are true to form.
Adri and I are the bookends, and Emma is the center.
I entitled this block, Las Tres Hermanas. I know our brother would say it is more like The Three Tonies, because he says we are all versions of our mother. My nephew has rated us in the order of mom’s traits. Adri is Tonie the Greater; I am Tonie the Equal To; and Emma is Tonie the Lesser Than.
Emma is the one who looks like our mother. Adri and I look more like our dad. And our brother, well, we call him Pepe Jr. He looks exactly like our dad.
We really are our mother’s daughters…and proud of it!

Block #22~Friday, June 1
Las Tres Hermanas
Background: Beige cotton linen memo
Technique: Thread Sketching; FMQ

Viva Fiesta! Block #16 Friday, April 20

Every April, San Antonio celebrates the heroes of the Alamo and the different cultures of our city.
Fiesta began in 1891 with the Battle of Flowers Parade.
The festivities have grown to include numerous events: the day parade, the Battle of Flowers; the night parade, Fiesta Flambeau; Night in Old San Antonio;carnivals, art, music, and food galore.
As a child, my family would pack an ice chest with drinks and chicken salad sandwiches. We would carry our own folding chairs and enjoy the festivities. My mom, usually very quiet and proper, would whistle, yell, sing, and march. Marching bands are my favorite, especially the band from my Alma Mater,
the University of Texas …they always open the Flambeau.
In my classroom, we would study the history of our city and cultures throughout the month of April.We decorated our room, and ourselves, with bright and festive colors. The children would make papel picado to hang from the hallway ceilings. Tissue flowers were strung up across the room.We made our own badges and hats to wear all month.
And of course, for the entire month, I wore my Mexican dresses, flowers in my hair, and cascarones or chili pepper earrings. Our school would have a Fiesta festival, and our first grade and kinder classes would have a parade in the hallways. I would have the University of Texas CD blasting the
Eyes of Texas/Texas Fight songs, as we marched our way through the school.
This year, Fiesta is extra special, since the city is celebrating its Tricentennial.
So, the block for Friday, April 20, is inspired by Fiesta.
I do not make it a habit of taking selfies, but one of my goals in thread sketching is to improve on sketching cartoon people images. So, I decided to try to thread sketch my Fiesta Self. For this block, I did not draw myself with pencil on the fabric. I just thread sketched…that is why you will see that the hand and arms are not the best. I did draw in the eyes with ink pen. In the image, I am making the “Hook’em Horns” sign, and I am holding a raspa, snow cone. At the Texas Quilt Museum, I had seen a quilt that had some designs cut-out in the  fabric. I do not know what this technique is called, so I’ll just say “cut-out”. I decided to try to use this technique and make the papel picado from scraps.

Friday, April 20
Viva Fiesta!
Background: White Kona painted with acrylic
Technique: Thread sketch, cut-out, free motion quilting, fabric painting with acrylics, pastels, and pencil